Vaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerless

A mass demonstration erupts in Hviezdoslav Square in downtown Bratislava (in the following days, it moves to the Square of the Slovak National Uprising). The students present demands and ask the people to participate in the general strike planned for Monday, November 27. A separate demonstration demands the release of the political prisoner Ján Čarnogurský (later Prime Minister of Slovakia) in front of the Palace of Justice. Alexander Dubček addresses this demonstration—his first appearance during the Velvet Revolution. As a result, Čarnogurský is released on November 23. Further demonstrations follow in all major cities of Czechoslovakia.

“It’s too early to say because we are still getting condolences from our colleagues abroad. But some of the translators let us know that their translations will be published in the coming months – I mean the translations of Leaving which has been translated into some 20 languages but many of them have not been published. So they might start coming out now. There are also people who want to read out his plays in homage. So it’s early to say but we do expect an increase in interest in his plays. On the other hand, it will be complicated because of the legislation; we not have to wait for how his estate will be sorted out.”

Vaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerless

vaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerless

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vaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerlessvaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerlessvaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerlessvaclav havel wrote an essay the power of the powerless