Thesis on nanotechnology

Professor Vancso's current scientific interests revolve around macromolecular nanotechnology and materials science of soft matter. Particular attention is given to surface engineering, surface-initiated polymerizations (polymer brushes), single molecule chemistry and physics, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), single emitter photonics, nanostructured materials, and materials chemistry of organometallic polymers. Biointerfaces, specifically synthetic polymers in contact with seawater, and biomaterials in tissue engineering receive increasing attention in his work. His research in macromolecular nanotechnology started with a research award of the Prime Minister of Ontario, Canada in 1989 allowing him to initiate a program in AFM of soft matter at the University of Toronto, focusing on nanoscale observations, studies of molecular properties, and molecular manipulation of polymeric materials. He has been currently awarded by an NWO-TOP grant ( Netherlands Foundation for Scientific Research ) in macromolecular nanotechnology of stimulus responsive polymers. These grants are "directed at research groups that excel in (bio)chemistry or chemical technology". The grants "offer these groups the opportunity and freedom strengthen or extend, challenging and innovative lines of research". He (co)authored 365 + papers, which scored a total of 8,200 citations and earned him an "h-factor" of 44 (December, 2012). With his coworkers he  coauthored five patents, and recently published a monograph on "Scanning Force Microscopy of Polymers" (Springer).

Depending on your situation and your needs, you might or might not find some of the currently available human modification or enhancement options useful. Some of these are commonplace – exercise, healthy diet, relaxation techniques, time management, study skills, information technology, coffee or tea (as stimulants), education, and nutritional supplements (such as vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, or hormones). Others you might not have thought of, such as getting a cryonic suspension contract (see “What is cryonics? Isn’t the probability of success too small?” ), or chewing nicotine gum for its nootropic effects. Still others – for instance pharmacological mood drugs or sex reassignment surgery – are suitable only for people who have special difficulties or needs.

Abstract: Temperature dependence on the phase structure was investigated for drawn and undrawn ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by solid-state high resolution 13C NMR. The fully relaxed DD/MAS 13C NMR spectra provided the fractions of crystalline, interphase, and amorphous, and the analysis on molecular mobility by spin-lattice relaxation time provided three components in the orthorhombic phase, two components in the monoclinic phase and a single component in the interphase and amorphous phase, respectively. The molecular mobility of orthorhombic phase for drawn UHMWPE was the lowest of three samples, corresponding to the most rigid. This closely relates with good mechanical properties for drawn UHMWPE. The T1C was as high as 2040 s even at 100 °C for drawn UHMWPE. With increasing temperature, a part of the most mobile chain in the orthorhombic phase which locates at the lamellar surface transforms to that in the interphase, and then the interphase also transforms to the amorphous. The drawn UHMWPE had high fraction of the monoclinic phase and lattice defect which are induced by highly drawing. These fractions decreased with increasing temperature. So the monoclinic phase exists as a defect in the orthorhombic phase, and the molecular chain corresponding to the lattice defect would connect the monoclinic and orthorhombic phases. The monoclinic phase transforms to the orthorhombic phase with increasing temperature. This resulted in the small fractional decrement of orthorhombic phase.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY (extended here ):
Malcolm Carroll is the Principal Investigator for research on silicon quantum computing at Sandia National Laboratories, including development of quantum dots, cryoelectronics and quantum error correction schemes for future quantum circuitry. In 2001 he received a . in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University and joined Bell Labs/Lucent Technologies at Murray Hill, NJ. In 2003 and 2006 he became a senior and then principal member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. Dr. Carroll was a Fulbright Fellow and has been an author on over 50 peer reviewed articles and 3 patents. He co-founded and is an organizing committee member of the Silicon Quantum Computing Workshop series and is an external advisor for the Australian Centre for Quantum Computing Technology.

Thesis on nanotechnology

thesis on nanotechnology

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY (extended here ):
Malcolm Carroll is the Principal Investigator for research on silicon quantum computing at Sandia National Laboratories, including development of quantum dots, cryoelectronics and quantum error correction schemes for future quantum circuitry. In 2001 he received a . in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University and joined Bell Labs/Lucent Technologies at Murray Hill, NJ. In 2003 and 2006 he became a senior and then principal member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. Dr. Carroll was a Fulbright Fellow and has been an author on over 50 peer reviewed articles and 3 patents. He co-founded and is an organizing committee member of the Silicon Quantum Computing Workshop series and is an external advisor for the Australian Centre for Quantum Computing Technology.

Media:

thesis on nanotechnologythesis on nanotechnologythesis on nanotechnologythesis on nanotechnology