Thesis for comparison contrast paper

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Grades range between 0 and 10, 5 being the passing mark. However, since grading practice differs amongst awarding institutions, a descriptive mark is used, which is more or less universal throughout Greece. For example, in the National Technical University of Athens, a grade in the diploma between 5 and is "good" (καλώς), a grade between and is "very good" (λίαν καλώς) and a grade of or more is "excellent" (άριστα). [45] In the University of Patras [46] the ranges are from 5 to (good), from to (very good) and from to 10 (excellent).

Try to develop the topic from the very beginning – say two leading sentences about each subject and then transform them into the thesis statement which consists of several points to be discussed in your comparison thesis. If you just say that “this thing” and “that thing” is very similar or very different, the reader will have the question: “Why?” if there are no statements supporting your claim. Thus, do not write general statements because such sentences require judgment and you will be asked where it is.

There are no hard and fast rules about organizing a comparison/contrast paper, of course. Just be sure that your reader can easily tell what’s going on! Be aware, too, of the placement of your different points. If you are writing a comparison/contrast in service of an argument, keep in mind that the last point you make is the one you are leaving your reader with. For example, if I am trying to argue that Amante is better than Pepper’s, I should end with a contrast that leaves Amante sounding good, rather than with a point of comparison that I have to admit makes Pepper’s look better. If you’ve decided that the differences between the items you’re comparing/contrasting are most important, you’ll want to end with the differences—and vice versa, if the similarities seem most important to you.

Thesis for comparison contrast paper

thesis for comparison contrast paper

There are no hard and fast rules about organizing a comparison/contrast paper, of course. Just be sure that your reader can easily tell what’s going on! Be aware, too, of the placement of your different points. If you are writing a comparison/contrast in service of an argument, keep in mind that the last point you make is the one you are leaving your reader with. For example, if I am trying to argue that Amante is better than Pepper’s, I should end with a contrast that leaves Amante sounding good, rather than with a point of comparison that I have to admit makes Pepper’s look better. If you’ve decided that the differences between the items you’re comparing/contrasting are most important, you’ll want to end with the differences—and vice versa, if the similarities seem most important to you.

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